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Crawley CCG Staff Visit Local Primary Schools

The Mill primary school






 












NHS Crawley Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) staff are visiting local primary schools to help educate children on where best to seek medical advice if they feel unwell.

Yesterday the CCG visited two schools in the local area; Waterfield School in Crawley and The Mill Primary School also in Crawley.

Janette McClintock, Head Teacher at The Mill Primary School, said: “As well as educating children on where best to go if they or a member of their family gets ill I also think it is really important children know about the wider functions of the NHS, such as the importance of the pharmacy”.

The interactive assemblies involve children choosing where best to send Monkey (a puppet used as a tool to talk to children about healthcare services) after being presented with a range of scenarios involving Monkey injuring himself. The children then work out the most appropriate place for him to receive medical attention. The aim of the assemblies is to make people think twice about going to A&E for injuries that could have been seen elsewhere and ensure people get the right care, in the right place, at the right time when it’s #notanemergency.

Veryan Nicholls, Children’s and Maternity Programme Manager at NHS Crawley and NHS Horsham and Mid Sussex CCGs, said: “We were pleased to have the opportunity of sharing the #notanemergency message with the children and to talk with them about the help their local pharmacy can provide if they are unwell. We were really impressed with how much they knew about the Crawley Urgent Treatment Centre and the different services the NHS provides”.

Children were also given a card to attach to their fridges at home so parents could also be aware of the best place for their child if unwell.

Heather Woolsey, a local mother whose child attends St Margaret’s school, the first school the CCG visited, said: “My five year old son came home from school and was telling me that when you had a little burn you should go to the pharmacist. He’d heard that in an assembly given by the Children’s and Maternity Programme Manager at the CCG. It was great that he’d heard that information and brought it home with him - he also had a card that outlines where you should go for different illnesses, which he likes to look at because it has an ambulance on it. It’s such a simple but great idea to educate children on where to go if they need emergency – or non-emergency – care” explained.

The CCG #notanemergency assembly will now roll out across other schools in the community, following on from the success of the first few.

Please click here for link to our video of the assembly 





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