Case Studies

Crawley Mosque.jpg

Keep Well for Winter Case Study - 22nd January 2020:

The Public Involvement team for the West Sussex CCGs have been working closely with our partner organisations from across the county on the Keep Well for Winter Campaign to join up our engagement activities and to reach out to the wider public, especially to groups and communities that we often seldom hear from such as our BAME and LGBTQ+ communities.  

The case study describes the partnership approach - click here

Crawley Mosque (Broadfield) - 5th July 2019:  

As part of the engagement on the NHS Long Term Plan, a combined team of the Lay Member for Patient and Public Engagement, commissioners, pharmacists and engagement colleagues at NHS Crawley Clinical Commissioning Group spoke with and listened to the views of the Mosque community on the health and care services in the local area at the Crawley (Broadfield) Mosque on Friday 5th July 2019. The Crawley CCG team were also invited to observe and participate in Friday prayers.

Over 200 people between the ages of 7-100 years-old voiced their views about the local health and care services in Crawley, which has influenced and shaped the planning of the NHS Long-Term Plan.

Arif Syed, Chairman of Crawley Mosque and Crawley CCG Lay Member for Patient and Public Engagement, said: "Often the voices of our less affluent communities are not heard and, as a result, experience poor health outcomes. In order to address the health inequalities in Crawley, we need to work closely with our communities by listening and taking into consideration the views of minority groups. I am pleased that Crawley CCG is starting to reach these communities in their comfort zones by listening and acting on the views of the public and patients. I am delighted with the level of attendance and engagement – my gratitude goes to the Crawley CCG team, particularly the engagement team”.

The main feedback collected at Crawley Mosque is outlined below:  

  • GP care is a top priority for improvement in the local area.
  • It is difficult to get a GP appointment, and there is a lack of information about Out of Hours appointments.
  • Waiting times for Emergency Care (A&E) were very long, and there is little information about alternative services.
  • The Asian community often struggle to talk about mental health.

The feedback received fed into in our response to the NHS Long Term Plan:

1. Our Plan: Reducing pressures on urgent and emergency care services

We want to make sure that Urgent and Emergency Care focusses on unplanned incidents, and that emergency care in particular is the highest escalation point for patient care. We are developing a networked model for urgent care that is aligned across Sussex, and working to support our emergency care at Accident and Emergency departments to better manage the demand on services. We will be working to develop clear information about the range of urgent care services available, including NHS 111 which will be improved and enhanced, and GP Improved Access appointments.

2. Our Plan: Reducing waits for planned care

We are committed to reducing the delays patients face when they access hospital care, including for musculoskeletal (bones and joints) services. We will work with our providers to reduce waiting lists, reduce length of stay in hospital and- where feasible to do so- move some care into primary and community settings.

We will also introduce “First Contact Practitioners” into our muscloskeletal services, which will help provide faster access to diagnosis and treatment, and support more people to self-manage.

3. Our Plan: Improving mental health outcomes

We have wide ranging plans to improve and further develop our services for people with mental health issues. Our existing plans have been built after extensive engagement with service users, carers and communities; we have developed an integrated strategic approach to mental health transformation across Sussex, covering a range of areas of mental health services for children and young people and adults, for perinatal mental health and suicide and bereavement support.  We will continue to work with the voluntary and community sector as service providers, and will continue to work closely with services such as housing in order to progress a partnership approach to care and support.

Dementia is a key area of focus for Sussex, as our rates are higher than the national average.  We have a specific Dementia workstream, and the feedback below plus wider intelligence and views will be included as we develop our plans further.

4. Our Plan: To reduce health inequalities

We know that there are still significant health inequalities across our area, which is not acceptable. Reducing these inequalities is central to all of our work, and will be addressed through all workstreams.

Making Our Winter Messaging Accessible, April - December 2019

Working for the NHS, we are all very familiar with the time honoured winter messages shared each year between October and March. But for those not fluent in English, understanding where to go when you are unwell is not always clear.

Between April - December 2019 the CCGs' Communications and Involvement Team and the CCGs’ patient group, the CPRG (Commissioning Patient Reference Group), worked alongside the Urgent Care Team to co-design a more holistic approach to winter comms. Using audience insights (patient questionnaires, focus groups and demand modelling), we honed in on key groups to promote behaviour-changes and raise awareness of where to go and when to access care.

We engaged with the following key groups to broaden conversations on Urgent Care services:

  • Parents of young children,
  • Mental Health service users,
  • Homeless community,
  • People with learning disabilities,
  • BAME groups, and
  • Faith and cultural groups.

We met with a number of these communities to discuss the draft communications approach, specifically the messaging and channels, to check if this resonated with their community and what else they may suggest.

The results included the translation of three posters from the national suite of materials into ten different languages for community meeting places (e.g. mosques or homeless shelters); production of a bespoke video series featuring our clinical lead; as well as some tailored written communications for community publications.

All of this complimented the Sussex-wide winter communications campaign, which continues to promote services to help with the demand across all our services, using a range of channels both online and traditional media. 

Tamil Learning Centre - 1st June 2019  

As part of the engagement on the NHS Long Term Plan, engagement colleagues at NHS Crawley Clinical Commissioning Group spoke with and listened to the views of the Sri Lankan community at the Tamil Learning Centre on the health and care services in the local area on Saturday 1st June 2019.

Over 30 people between the ages of 7-70 years-old voiced their views about the local health and care services in Three Bridges, which has influenced and shaped the planning of the NHS Long-Term Plan.

The main feedback gathered is outlined below:  

  • Self-care and prevention were recognised as incredibly important, but there was a feeling that the community were very good at doing this already i.e. following advice from NHS 111, eating and exercising correctly, and taking the advice from pharmacists.
  • There was support for GP receptionists triaging patients to the most appropriate services.
  • Mental health and wellbeing was recognised as incredibly important to all attendees. Attendees felt that more social clubs should be offered for the lonely and isolated within the community, particularly clubs that encouraged integration between Sri Lankan community and other communities in Three Bridges. They felt that social prescribing clubs should be offered to everyone regardless of race and creed, and the clubs on offer should be accessible to the diverse community in the area.
  • NHS 111 was seen as valuable, but there was a feeling that there was little knowledge about it. There was support for pre-bookable Out of Hours Appointments.

The feedback received fed into in our response to the NHS Long Term Plan:

1. Our Plan: Reducing pressures on urgent and emergency care services

We want to make sure that Urgent and Emergency Care focusses on unplanned incidents, and that emergency care in particular is the highest escalation point for patient care. We are developing a networked model for urgent care that is aligned across Sussex, and working to support our emergency care at Accident and Emergency departments to better manage the demand on services. We will be working to develop clear information about the range of urgent care services available, including NHS 111 which will be improved and enhanced, and GP Improved Access appointments.

2. Our Plan: Improving mental health outcomes

We have wide ranging plans to improve and further develop our services for people with mental health issues. Our existing plans have been built after extensive engagement with service users, carers and communities; we have developed an integrated strategic approach to mental health transformation across Sussex, covering a range of areas of mental health services for children and young people and adults, for perinatal mental health and suicide and bereavement support. We will continue to work with the voluntary and community sector as service providers, and will continue to work closely with services such as housing in order to progress a partnership approach to care and support.

3. Our Plan: Giving people more control over their own health and more personalised care

At the core of our plans is the role of personalised care, giving choice and the support to self-manage to our people, who are often experts in their own care. 

We will work to develop clear information about treatment- how it works and what outcomes to expect. We will work with our people to develop information on self-management that is clear, and in a range of formats. As part of this we will be exploring digital solutions to provide supported self-management.

We will develop our existing social prescribing services to span Sussex; these services will allow referrals from health and other professionals and self-referral, and will provide a systematic and person centred way to access community based and non-clinical support.

4. Our Plan: To reduce health inequalities

We know that there are still significant health inequalities across our area, which is not acceptable. Reducing these inequalities is central to all of our work, and will be addressed through all services.

 Autism Support Crawley - 13 February 2019:  

Here at NHS Crawley Clinical Commissioning Group (CCCG) and NHS Horsham and Mid-Sussex Clinical Commissioning Group (HMSCCG) we have been busy getting out and about, meeting and listening to our communities as part of our Big Health and Care Conversation.

On Thursday 13 February 2019 NHS Crawley Clinical Commissioning Group (CCCG) and NHS Horsham and Mid-Sussex Clinical Commissioning Group (HMSCCG), working in collaboration with Carers Support West Sussex, attended an Autism Support Crawley (ASC) meeting at the Broadfield Children and Family Centre in Crawley.

Autism Support Crawley (ASC) is a group of parents and carers of children and adults on the Autistic spectrum or with social communication difficulties. It was formed in 2007, and since then has over 1,100 members.

Dr Patience Okorie, Clinical Lead for Paediatric and Maternity services with NHS Crawley CCG, said:

“We wanted to listen to, understand, and act on what really matters to patients and people in our communities.

We spoke with a group of parents and carers of children and adults on the Autistic spectrum or with social communication difficulties to hear their views of local health and care services in the area, to communicate difficulties with understanding hidden disabilities, and to inform and update parents and carers of local services available to support them.

We have already started to act on the feedback received. We will continue to work with healthcare professionals, particularly GP Practices, Walk-in Centres and Hospitals, to raise awareness of hidden disabilities.

We thank Autism Support Crawley for their time in engaging with us”.

Maria Cook, Chair of Autism Support Crawley, said:

“We welcomed the positive discussions and opportunity with the Clinical Commissioning Group and Carers Support West Sussex to feed back our experiences of local health and care services to enhance services and provision for our community”.  

Further information on the services and topics discussed can be found here

A summary of the feedback can be found here, but we have outlined some of the comments below:

You Said:

We have had difficulty in being flagged as carers on their GP database, and therefore, have not been offered the free flu vaccines.

We Said:

If you are a main carer for an older or disabled person you are eligible for a free flu jab.

We launched a winter campaign ‘Help Us, Help You’ to raise awareness of the flu jab, using a wide range of channels to communicate and reach people such as newspapers, posters, social media, CCG websites, videos, Patient Roundup newsletter, podcast as well as face-to-face engagement.

We will continue to work with GP Practices to ensure they offer the flu jab to those who are eligible for the vaccine.

You Said:

Appointments taking place via Skype (video call) is a good idea. Is the CCG looking to introduce this?

We Did:

We are looking to create a new service for patients to access their GP practice. We want the service to be created based on the feedback from our patients. We will be engaging with our patients, public and GP practices to gauge the appetite for an online service that allows patients to contact their GP practice digitally as an alternative to the usual methods. This service would allow patients to provide their symptoms digitally to their GP practice who would forward the information to the appropriate healthcare professional (GP, nurse, or alternative healthcare professional) who in turn would respond to the patient directly via an internet platform (email, web chat etc.). It is also possible that the patient may be redirected to another service i.e. pharmacy/ urgent care centre or self-care depending on the individual case.

This service will not replace telephone bookings or face to face appointments with GP’s. It is designed to be another way to access primary care which will potentially be more convenient for digitally engaged patients.

We are attempting to reach as many patients as possible across Sussex and East Surrey to find out their thoughts on how the service should run. We created an online survey and encouraged friends, family and local communities to join us in creating a service that is right for you. Please click here for patient information leaflet. 

Find out more

Would you like the Clinical Commissioning Group to attend an event or group? Contact us>